Category Archives: Book Club

Reading Circles Goes LIVE! & Call For Writing Circles’ Submissions

reading circles

 

Our next Reading Circles Goes LIVE! event is set for January 31 at 8 p.m. CST. This is what we’ll be reading:

hour_i_first_believedThe Hour I First Believed
Wally Lamb

High school teacher Caelum Quirk and his wife, Maureen, a school nurse, move to Littleton, Colorado, where they both get jobs at Columbine High School. In April 1999, Caelum is away and Maureen is witness to the horrific school massacre. She survives, but cannot recover from the trauma. Caelum and Maureen try to find safety on the Quirk family’s Connecticut farm, but come to find the difficulty of life after trauma.

*     *     *

**ANNOUNCEMENT**

We are opening up Reading Circles as a space to submit Writing Circles’ pieces to share with the larger Bigger Picture Blogs community. If you have a piece that you wrote for a Writing Circles session that you would like to share here, please email your piece to me (with a short bio, link to your blog, and any photos you’d like to include) at: jade.celene.keller [at] gmail.com and I will highlight them here! This is ongoing, so please feel free to make submissions at any time.

Happy Friday!

 

Reading Circles – Going LIVE Again!

reading circles

Happy New Year!! (And ohmigod is it really Friday? I don’t believe it.)

We’re ringing in the New Year with another LIVE Reading Circle!  Here are the details:

Who: A group of 4-5 lovers of the written word

What: Read a book of our choice & Discuss it online – like a virtual book club

Where: In the comfort of your own home, via Google Hangout

When: January 31, 2013, 8 p.m. CST

Why: Because reading is awesome

How: R.S.V.P  no later than January 9 by emailing me at jade.celene.keller@gmail.com. Put “Cool Kids Read” in the subject line and tell me which TWO books you’d most like to read. The book with the most votes wins.

I will announce the read next Friday!

Are you ready to see the choices? Here they are:

fault-in-our-stars-signed-copyThe Fault In Our Stars
John Green

A soulful YA novel about Hazel, a sixteen-year-old with terminal cancer, who meets Augustus at a cancer support group. The two are kindred spirits with a shared sense of humor. They fall in love and must confront some of life’s most difficult, and yet universal questions.

hour_i_first_believedThe Hour I First Believed
Wally Lamb

High school teacher Caelum Quirk and his wife, Maureen, a school nurse, move to Littleton, Colorado, where they both get jobs at Columbine High School. In April 1999, Caelum is away and Maureen is witness to the horrific school massacre. She survives, but cannot recover from the trauma. Caelum and Maureen try to find safety on the Quirk family’s Connecticut farm, but come to find the difficulty of life after trauma.

left neglectedLeft Neglected
Lisa Genova

Sarah Nickerson is a Harvard graduate turned career-driven supermom, masterfully balancing a jam-packed family schedule – until one day and accident leaves her with a traumatic brain injury and she is forced to relinquish control to those around her while she, who cannot even floss her teeth on her own anymore, is stuck trying to put back the pieces of her life.

rosenblumMr. Rosenblum Dreams In English
Natasha Solomons

Post WWII, Jack Rosenblum, his wife Sadie, and their baby daughter escape Berlin and move to London, where they are greeted with pamphlets instructing them on how to behave like the English. Jack follows the instructions to the letter, but finds he cannot achieve that one last hallmark of Britishness: membership in a golf club. So he decides to create his own – much to Sadie’s distress. Hijincks ensue, presumably with much of that famed dry British wit.

turn of mindTurn of Mind
Alice LaPlante

Dr. Jennifer White, a brilliant surgeon, is accused of murdering her best friend, Amanda. The trouble is Dr. White can’t remember whether she did it or not. As the police try to investigate the murder, the reader follows Dr. White’s progression into Alzheimer’s, seeing with first-person clarity the terror as an aging woman begins to lose her mind and her adult children can only stand by and watch in a futile attempt to protect her from herself.

Those are our picks! Be sure to vote on your favorite and RSVP ASAP. Happy Friday everyone!

Reading Circles – {This Is How}

reading circles

We’re in the middle of a short series, where we read Augusten Burrough’s kick-in-the-pants of a book called This Is How and share snippets we’ve found to be insightful or thought-provoking.

As we round out the end of a year and turn towards a new one, where many people start making new resolutions or coming back with renewed resolve towards previous ones, I’d like to share this piece from him:

I am a complete and total fuckup. Which is exactly why I am equipped to write this book and tell you how to live…

{He explains how he got into ring making.}

…Each time, I tried to make one nice ring. Each time, I totally failed.

Until ring number 301. Which was suddenly, inexplicably cool.

Now I make more good rings than lousy ones. There are always new mistakes to make. But I almost never make my old, rerun mistakes.

Perfectionism is the satin-lined casket of creativity and originality. If you are a perfectionist, at least stop telling everybody you’re one and try to get over it yourself, alone in your home with the lights off.

This isn’t to say you shouldn’t try your best or that it’s okay to get lazy. What it does mean, though, is if you approach a piece of writing or a photo or a canvas with thoughts to making it “perfect” you are not thinking about the art. You are thinking about yourself. You are not being present in the moment. You are only rubbing a soft, familiar spot on your ego. Why? Because you’re already thinking about what other people will think of it and of you, before you’ve even made a mark on the page.

Moreover, perfectionism suggests that there is an ideal, a standard of “perfection.” If there is an ideal, then that suggests everything else is not that ideal. If there’s only one way to do something, then practically by definition, that one way becomes unoriginal.

So, do the best you can, but do it your way. Don’t fear failure; if you do something to the best of your ability enough times, you might just strike on gold you’d never have found if you hadn’t given yourself the opportunity.